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Collective bodies such as communities, protest groups, research teams, or institutions can perform speech acts: they can speak with one voice, or rally behind a unified message. At the same time, such groups can be treated unjustly as speakers: they can be silenced, stifled, ignored, or dismissed.

Funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF project no P33682-G), this project explores the pragmatics and politics of group speech. It develops a normativist account of the pragmatic structure of group speech and uses this account to illuminate practices of group silencing in two politically salient contexts – consultation with indigenous communities, and protest movements.

Latest work

Webinar: Feminist and Queer Approaches to Environmental Law and Human Rights

20 April, 5pm CET Speakers:Emily Jones (Essex) – “Posthuman Feminism and the Rights of Nature” Atieno Mboya Samandari (Emory) – “Ecofeminist Approaches to Climate Change” Ellen Spannagel (McGill) – “The Experiences and Resistance of Gender, Sexual, and Romantic Minorities to the Climate Crisis” Nicholas Stump (West Virginia) – “Radical Intersections: Critical Environmental Human Rights andContinue reading “Webinar: Feminist and Queer Approaches to Environmental Law and Human Rights”

New article: ‘Epistemic Injustice and Indigenous Peoples in the Inter-American Human Rights System’

By Dina Lupin Townsend and Leo Townsend, prepared for a special issue of Social Epistemology ABSTRACT: In this paper we examine the epistemic treatment of Indigenous peoples by the Inter-American Court and Commission on Human Rights, two institutions that have sought to affirm the rights of Indigenous peoples in the wake of colonialism and industrialContinue reading “New article: ‘Epistemic Injustice and Indigenous Peoples in the Inter-American Human Rights System’”

The project is funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), project number P33682-G, and hosted by the Department of Philosophy of the University of Vienna.

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